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JAPAN
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GO!GO!MOVIE
#001
New York Magazine
JULY 30 – AUGUST 6, 2007
New York's Best Cheap Eats 2007

Why they named this Japanese cur¬ry shack for the number on Hideki Matsui’s back, we don’t know. (Go, with or without the exclamation point, means “five” in Japanese.) But they take every opportunity to play it up: The telephone number’s last four digits are 5555, the busi¬ness day starts at 10:55 and ends at 9:55, and there’s a smattering of sports memorabilia like the jersey donated by some hockey player who is also a 55 on display. The specialty of the house, of course, is the thick, gloppy, slightly sweet brown sludge that fortunately tastes a lot bet¬ter than it looks, served with sticky white rice and a choice of deep-fried toppings of which the pork katsu, or panko-battered pork cutlet, is the best. It’s doubtful that the slugging colossus himself comes here to cel¬ebrate after he hits a home run, but if you do, you are entitled to a free topping coupon. — Rob Patronite and Robin Raisfeld
DAILY NEWS New York's Hometown Newspaper
Friday, June 22nd 2007,
FRIDAY FOOD
BEST BITES FOR LESS


eats beat

The welcome Mat-sui is out

By Irene Sax
Japanese curry is the anti-sushi: It's not light, not fresh, and not especially healthful. But this cheap and filling culinary icon is the mac and cheese of Japan, the dish mothers make for their kids, almost always with the help of a sauce mix. And it's what they serve at Go! Go! Curry, a tiny, raucous new spot in the Garment District.
Order your curry, and the smiling server will hand you an oval aluminum pan holding a mound of short-grain sticky rice covered with goopy dark-brown pork sauce that's sweet with pureed vegetables and lightly spiced with curry. It looks terrible, and if you didn't grow up eating it, you may think, "So what?" But fork up the gelatinous glop, mixing in rice, bites of finely shredded cabbage and of crunchy, deep-fried sliced pork cutlet, or katsu. First you'll be intrigued, then pleased, then eager for more. That eagerness is evident in the curry-loving crowds - mostly Japanese - that have been lining up for lunch outside this noisy, cheerful shop since it opened last month.
It's the first New York branch of a Japanese company whose name has nothing to do with go-go dancers, but is an homage to Yankee left fielder Hideki Matsui. In Japanese, "go-go" means 5-5, which is Matsui's number. His nickname "Godzilla" is reflected in the gorilla logo posted over the front door and the counter. The owner is so obsessed with his idol that portion sizes are called walks, singles, doubles and triples, instead of small, medium, large and extra-large, and on days when Matsui hits a home run, customers can pick a free topping of hard-boiled eggs, cheese, pickled radishes or fermented soy beans.
Prices start at $5 for a plain (that is, no protein) "walk" and climb to $12.50 for a "grand slam" serving of rice and panko-crusted pork, chicken, shrimp and sausage. There's absolutely nothing else but soda, water and green tea.

The Go! Go! in the eatery's name is a tribute to Hideki Matsui.